reptiles-rule-my-world
reptiles-rule-my-world:

crispysnakes:

alltailnolegs:

reptiliaherps:

gears-keep-turning:

theexoticvet:

reptiliaherps:

My snake, stetched out alongside the wall so he can size up the door to eat it.
But no, seriously— snakes look so weird when they’re stretched out.

I’m going to be harpooned for this, but this snake is obese.

It’s a blood python. They literally look like sausages with tiny little heads. If a blood python doesn’t look like a giant snake turd, then it’s probably underweight.
Plus, he’s probably got some poop stored up so that makes him look even fatter. 



Accurate. He does have some poop in there that’s making his ass end fatter— and I’ll also point out that he just ate the other day, and I was taking him out for some exercise.

theexoticvet calling obesity on an animal that would be harmed by this advice if in a doctor/patient relationship due to lack of the most basic of knowledge on the species in question? shocking.

^


Exotic vet and you don’t even know that a blood python is suppose to look like that?

This is an accurate example of issues that can and do occur when a non-herp specific vet sees reptiles. No hate towards theexoticvet. Unless the blog was formally stated to be a legally distinct source of veterinary information, backed with credentials, all readers should read with a grain of salt. Remember, it’s just a tumblr blog and behind a computer screen, there’s no difference between a 12 year old copy/pasting or a certified vet giving advice.In lieu of the situation, this brings up a topic I’m passionate about and that is reptiles and vets. It’s imperative that you do lots of research into choosing a veterinarian when it comes to your reptiles. For some reason, too many of vets lump reptiles together and treat them equally without consideration of the species or diagnosis. Make sure that the vet you choose is either a herp-vet or one with a notable amount of reptile experience. Getting involved in local reptile groups is important. Ask questions and seek advice from keepers. You’ll quickly find out if a vet in question is trustworthy and most likely be given names of preferred vets. I’m aware the vets only want to help and not all are as bad as I make them sound. I say all this because no one wants to be charged 100+ bucks to be instructed to put UV lights in a bp’s enclosure or a month of Baytril injections for a piece of stuck shed in a nasal canal. A proper diagnosis can be life or death. Don’t risk that. Do your research. It’s worth your time, money, and health of your animals.

reptiles-rule-my-world:

crispysnakes:

alltailnolegs:

reptiliaherps:

gears-keep-turning:

theexoticvet:

reptiliaherps:

My snake, stetched out alongside the wall so he can size up the door to eat it.

But no, seriously— snakes look so weird when they’re stretched out.

I’m going to be harpooned for this, but this snake is obese.

It’s a blood python. They literally look like sausages with tiny little heads. If a blood python doesn’t look like a giant snake turd, then it’s probably underweight.

Plus, he’s probably got some poop stored up so that makes him look even fatter. 

Accurate. He does have some poop in there that’s making his ass end fatter— and I’ll also point out that he just ate the other day, and I was taking him out for some exercise.

theexoticvet calling obesity on an animal that would be harmed by this advice if in a doctor/patient relationship due to lack of the most basic of knowledge on the species in question? shocking.

^

Exotic vet and you don’t even know that a blood python is suppose to look like that?

This is an accurate example of issues that can and do occur when a non-herp specific vet sees reptiles.

No hate towards theexoticvet. Unless the blog was formally stated to be a legally distinct source of veterinary information, backed with credentials, all readers should read with a grain of salt. Remember, it’s just a tumblr blog and behind a computer screen, there’s no difference between a 12 year old copy/pasting or a certified vet giving advice.

In lieu of the situation, this brings up a topic I’m passionate about and that is reptiles and vets. It’s imperative that you do lots of research into choosing a veterinarian when it comes to your reptiles. For some reason, too many of vets lump reptiles together and treat them equally without consideration of the species or diagnosis. Make sure that the vet you choose is either a herp-vet or one with a notable amount of reptile experience. Getting involved in local reptile groups is important. Ask questions and seek advice from keepers. You’ll quickly find out if a vet in question is trustworthy and most likely be given names of preferred vets.

I’m aware the vets only want to help and not all are as bad as I make them sound. I say all this because no one wants to be charged 100+ bucks to be instructed to put UV lights in a bp’s enclosure or a month of Baytril injections for a piece of stuck shed in a nasal canal. A proper diagnosis can be life or death. Don’t risk that.

Do your research. It’s worth your time, money, and health of your animals.